Prototype: “Theia” Is A Robotic Guide Dog That Helps Blind People Navigate
Description

What are a blind person’s options if they need a guide dog but cannot afford one? Can they get a robot instead? Anthony Camu, a student at Loughborough University, has recently designed a hand held product that more or less acts as a guide dog and helps blind people navigate to their destinations with ease.

This portable handheld device, named “Theia”, gets instructions from the user (“Theia, take me to Starbucks”), and using its built in “control moment gyroscope”, physically leads them to their destination, very similar to how it would feel if the user were pulling on a guide dog’s leash that was taking them somewhere. Theia is also capable of processing real time data (such as traffic and weather) to guide users correctly and safely to their destination. According to Anthony, Theia aims to make a blind person’s life comfortable by providing them with abilities that they otherwise may not happen. Theia is especially helpful for blind people who cannot afford to keep a guide dog with them because of monetary or space constraints. 

Watch the video below to learn more about Theia.

As of now, Theia is still a prototype but has potential to become a real product in the future. What do you think? 

Source: Engineering & Technology

The post Prototype: “Theia” Is A Robotic Guide Dog That Helps Blind People Navigate appeared first on Assistive Technology Blog.

Comments
Order by: 
Per page:
 
  • There are no comments yet
Related Feed Entries
Children with autism may have a subtly different set of bacteria in their gut than their non-autistic siblings, according to unpublished data presented virtually on Tuesday at the 2021 Society for Neuroscience Global Connectome. The prospect that manipulating the microbiome could ease gastrointestin…
23 hours ago · From Spectrum News
Excess UBE3A, an autism-linked protein, may shape how neurons fire, according to unpublished research presented virtually on Monday at the 2021 Society for Neuroscience Global Connectome. (Links to abstracts may work only for registered conference attendees.) The findings may offer an explanation fo…
23 hours ago · From Spectrum News
After 3 days, 12 panels, 67 socials and 2,000-plus poster sessions, the 2021 Society for Neuroscience Global Connectome came to a close on Wednesday. The conference — the society’s first since it cancelled its 2020 annual meeting this past October because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — was al…
2 days ago · From Spectrum News
Autistic children have a harder time catching a ball than non-autistic children do, possibly because they are less able to predict its trajectory, according to a new unpublished study. Researchers presented the findings virtually this week at the 2021 Society for Neuroscience Global Connectome. The …
2 days ago · From Spectrum News
I was diagnosed with Autism, Asperger’s at the age of 44 but it wasn’t a surprise just a relief. What led to my diagnoses though was a lifetime of anxiety, a real feeling I did “not fit in” and I suffered from episodes of depression as a result. I was unable to do anything …
2 days ago · From The Art of Autism
Rate
0 votes
Info
27.10.2020 (27.10.2020)
10 Views
0 Subscribers
Recommend
Tags