Browse Feed Entries By Tag: autism and music
Following rules and rituals I create unique compositions. By Roland Bühlmann My music follows certain, partly unconscious rules. Following rules and rituals is typical for autistic people. My music is linear, made up of individual voices, all are more or less melodic. A kind of polyphony without con…
06.01.2021 · From The Art of Autism
“No diagnostic manual can truly explain the multi-faceted experience of autism,” Elisabeth Wiklander By Ron Sandison Elisabeth Wiklander was raised in a musically talented family. Her dad is a pianist, organist, and composer and mom a conductor, singer, and clarinetist. When Elisabeth w…
01.07.2020 · From The Art of Autism
By Dana Trick Sinking like a stone— You’re human, Not a rock, And you have the limbs to Swim towards the surface. Curiosity killed the cat— There are trillions of things that could have Killed the cat as well as you. Why do you promote foolish ignorance When knowledge is essential? Blind as a bat—…
01.07.2020 · From The Art of Autism
“Low pitched notes really make me feel like love might be truly possible.  High pitched notes make me feel like I could go  crazy with pain and sadness. Great rhythms can make me feel like life is freedom.” By Jeremy Sicile-Kira Music makes my life feel normal sometimes because…
30.05.2018 · From The Art of Autism
Kerry Fenster talks about music and his program Songs About Us Music is the ultimate entity in any context. It’s a universal language, like math, or love – understood, beloved, treasured, played, performed, and enjoyed across every piece of this world. People in love have “their song”, armies have…
12.09.2017 · From The Art of Autism
A Christmas Tale about the gift of music by Lori Jagow From my small apartment, the tune of “Good King Wenceslas” blared from my son’s shiny brass trumpet. My eight year old son, Jimmy, practiced for his first Christmas concert in the school orchestra. Jimmy is autistic and his music teacher recomme…
01.12.2016 · From The Art of Autism
“Vibrant waves of sequenced patterns emerged in my head whenever I looked at musical notes and scores. Like pieces of a mysterious puzzle solved, it was natural for me to see music and its many facets as pictures in my head. It never occurred to me that others couldn’t see what I saw.” By Stephen S…
17.06.2016 · From The Art of Autism